Are your scaps working?

When we do pulling movements we should be thinking about retraction and depression of the scapulae (shoulder blades).  Many athletes perform pulling movements incorrectly, compensating with humeral hyperextension.  In humeral hyperextension the humerus moves behind the torso with no action coming from the retraction of the shoulder blades.   As athletes pull only with the arms the scapula goes into anterior tilt, and loses all stability.  …

Feel like a million bucks today!

The foam roller should be every athlete’s best friend.  It is essentially a poor man’s massage.  Not every weekend warrior, or college athlete can afford a deep tissue massage every other day, and the foam roller is the perfect substitute.  It is essentially deep tissue massage that causes relaxation in the muscle.  It still surprises me how many coaches don’t fully know …

Single Leg Lowering

A great way to stretch the hamstrings is with our exercise Single Leg Lowering. It’s the beginner progression for our SL Lowering series. I believe we got this from Gray Cook, but it’s been so long ago that I’m not 100% positive. It’s a great exercise for those tight in the hammies. Remember to always stretch the front side of the …

Lower Crossed Syndrome II

Yesterday we touched on lower crossed syndrome.  Today, lets take a look at the steps we use to reset normal function.   We know that by definition lower crossed syndrome is when one side is inactive or inhibited due to lifestyle, training, etc, and the other side is over-active, or short.  Often times resetting the optimal length and stiffness on one …

Lower Crossed Syndrome

I came across something in a past article this afternoon that I’m going to expand on.   Knowing many coaches out there may not understand this concept I thought I would break it down a little more clearly.  The concept is that of the lower crossed syndrome.  If any of you have read Ultimate Back Fitness and Performance by Stuart McGill  then …

Empty Can vs. Full Can

A recent workout brought up a few questions on the validity of the shoulder exercise, the empty can.  The empty can has long been a staple in physical therapy circles when it comes to shoulder rehabilitation.  Dr Frank Jobe, a well known shoulder specialist, was the first the come up with this exercise.  Since then it has become widely known as an isolation execise for the supraspinatus, …

View Post

Quick notes on the Low Back

There is negative correlation between low back pain and flexibility. This is for all the athletic trainers out there that believe when you injure something it needs to be stretched because it must be tight.   The more flexible your low back, higher risk of injury.  You don’t want a flexible low back.  The lumbar spine needs high levels of stability …

Strains

Today we’ll stay on with the topic of pain and dysfunction from the day before.  Lets talk soft tissue injuries in the form of strains and pulls instead of the overuse joint pain we discussed earlier.  Again sticking to the concept, the problem isn’t where it always seems.  Let’s talk about soft tissue injuries now such as a quad, or hamstring …

Protraction and the bench press

Question: Isn’t the bench press training the scapula just the same as the pushup?  Wouldn’t this hit my serratus every time I bench press?  First off the bench press and most forms of db bench presses do not allow for movement whatsoever of the scapulae.  The scaps are pinned beneath the athlete’s body to the bench.  Typically no movement occurs.   Efficient bench press technique actually calls …

A Pain in the . . .Joint!

Most athletes will experience pain due to dysfunction at some point in the career.  We’re talking knee pains, low back pains, shoulder problems, and hip pain, hamstring pulls, etc.  You name it and most competitive athletes will experience one of the above.     What a lot of coaches, and athletic trainers for that matter, haven’t grasped is that movement dysfunction above or below the …