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Hip Matrix w/ Rotation

One of my favorite exercises for creating dis-association of the thoracic spine is the Hip Matrix w/ Rotation.  This movement came to us several years ago from one of our former interns Jeremy Fraden and we have used it ever since.  Dis-association can create high levels of muscle activation, and motor control within a joint or segment of the body.  In this instance an …

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Why Can’t You Move the Way I Want

Athletes often have underlying limitations as to why they struggle to move the way a coach may want them to. Muscle length isn’t always the answer to developing better movement.  More times than not, we as coaches evaluate a poor movement pattern and begin to prescribe stretches when the problem may be alternative to that.  Flexibility often isn’t the only …

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Considerations for Training Overhead Athletes

Guest Post Written by Drew Mitchell UC-Irvine Assistant Strength & Conditioning Coach www.twitter.com/uncle_drew80 Drew is a former intern of mine, and one of the smartest coaches you’ll find in the performance field.  He searches continuously for knowledge looking for the best methods to train his athletes at UC-Irvine.  This is a great post that gives coaches another perspective on the training …

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Where Have all the Max Days Gone

Every serious athlete who’s gone through a dedicated strength program one time or another can remember max days. We’ve all done them at one time or another. One day dedicated to testing your lifts to see how strong you’ve become from the previous training. Max days have their positives and negatives. For myself, as I’ve gained more experience, I often …

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Summer Research – Resisted Sprint Training

Our interns recently took on the project of researching various topics.  The most current topic was resisted sled training.  The following studies are breakdowns of what myself as well as part of our summer intern class found.  Resisted sprint training is a hot topic in the field of performance right now and many articles can be found recommending a variety …

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Creating Scapular Control

It’s no secret how important the scapula is in the health of an overhead throwing athlete.  A stable scapula gives rise to a healthy, mobile, glenohumeral joint.  The scapula is to the shoulder, what the low back and pelvis are to the hip.  The human body is always stabilizing, and mobilizing at the same time to create motion.  Look no …

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The Forgotten Serratus Anterior

The serratus anterior may be most overlooked muscle in importance for shoulder health in the throwing athlete.  The lower trap (LT), serratus anterior (SA), and upper trap (UT) all work in conjunction to form a force couple known as upward rotation. Upward rotation is of huge importance for shoulder health when it comes to the overhead athlete.  If you can’t …

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The APRE Good & Bad

The APRE is an great method to build strength in novice/intermediate athletes or re-build lost strength quickly.  I use the APRE at various times throughout an athletes duration on campus.  One of my friends and former classmates, Bryan Mann, had a good article on the APRE in this past month’s edition of Training & Conditioning magazine.  If you’re unfamiliar with the …

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What the Soviets Can Teach Us – Youth Athletes

Development of Speed Strength Qualities in Youngsters Theory and Practice of Physical Culture,  1963 O.V. Federov What they did Research was conducted to determine if the complex method of developing speed and strength simultaneously is more effective than its unilateral development.  Training both motor qualities simultaneously has not shown inhibit their development with youth athletes. This study was conducted over …

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Competitive Team Speed Training

Developing a competitive environment within training can be an important piece to continued development.  Competition pushes an athlete to perform, whether it’s in the weight room, or on the field for playing time.  Coaches fully understand the importance the role speed plays, but also realize that it may be the most difficult motor quality to develop.  It requires patience, consistency, and genetics to be honest.  …