The Beast Arrives!

I didn’t really have anything to talk about tonite, so I thought I would post on the newest member of our strength and conditioning staff.  Today in the weight room we got a delivery that will change our program forever.  Not really, I’m just kidding, but its the PROWLER from Elitefts.  A pushable, pullable sled that weighs in at about 75 …

Empty Can vs. Full Can

A recent workout brought up a few questions on the validity of the shoulder exercise, the empty can.  The empty can has long been a staple in physical therapy circles when it comes to shoulder rehabilitation.  Dr Frank Jobe, a well known shoulder specialist, was the first the come up with this exercise.  Since then it has become widely known as an isolation execise for the supraspinatus, …

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Quick notes on the Low Back

There is negative correlation between low back pain and flexibility. This is for all the athletic trainers out there that believe when you injure something it needs to be stretched because it must be tight.   The more flexible your low back, higher risk of injury.  You don’t want a flexible low back.  The lumbar spine needs high levels of stability …

Strains

Today we’ll stay on with the topic of pain and dysfunction from the day before.  Lets talk soft tissue injuries in the form of strains and pulls instead of the overuse joint pain we discussed earlier.  Again sticking to the concept, the problem isn’t where it always seems.  Let’s talk about soft tissue injuries now such as a quad, or hamstring …

Protraction and the bench press

Question: Isn’t the bench press training the scapula just the same as the pushup?  Wouldn’t this hit my serratus every time I bench press?  First off the bench press and most forms of db bench presses do not allow for movement whatsoever of the scapulae.  The scaps are pinned beneath the athlete’s body to the bench.  Typically no movement occurs.   Efficient bench press technique actually calls …

A Pain in the . . .Joint!

Most athletes will experience pain due to dysfunction at some point in the career.  We’re talking knee pains, low back pains, shoulder problems, and hip pain, hamstring pulls, etc.  You name it and most competitive athletes will experience one of the above.     What a lot of coaches, and athletic trainers for that matter, haven’t grasped is that movement dysfunction above or below the …

The Other Shrug

I’m sure a lot of coaches and athletes out there have seen the overhead shrug done before but may wonder why it’s good for shoulder health.  Lets start out by examining the anatomy of the scap a little bit.  There are three muscles responsible for upward rotation of the scapula.  Again, upward rotation of the scapula is extremely important for …

Coaching the Olympic Lifts

Today our new strength and conditioning interns at TCU got their first taste of the olympic lifts.  They learned the progressions to the lifts, coaching cues, and how to perform the lifts themselves.  Over the next several weeks they will work on perfecting their technique with each lift and its variations as well as learn how to coach and correct errors in the lifts.  This …

What you don’t know about the pushup!!!

The pushup is quite easily one of the best exercises athletes can do.  Most will only associate pushups for the chest, and triceps.  But it’s a great exercise for the total body and even more so the upper back. Reaping the benefits of the pushup means focusing on correct technique first and foremost.   Quite possibly the best part of a correct pushup for …

Power for the Anterior Chain

A large majority of training revolves around working the posterior chain, and rightly so.  The posterior chain is the primary powerhouse of athletics.  The grouping consists of the hamstrings, glute complex, low back, and I even include the mid and upper back as well as the calves into the posterior chain grouping, while most will refer only to the hams, …